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KNOX COUNTY BAR ASSOCIATION ANNOUNCES WILLIAM S. MADDOX AS NEW PRESIDENT

ROCKPORT - Attorney Bill Maddox was recently elevated to be President of the Knox County Bar Association.  Bill primarily focuses on appellate work.  He has won cases at every state and federal court level from judge trials in Knox County District Court and jury trials in Knox County Superior Court, to the United States Supreme Court.  His victory at the United States Supreme Court concerned a question of federal criminal jury instructions.  His most recent victory at the Maine Supreme Judicial Court concerned a successful defense of a divorce matter where he had won primary residence of children for his client at the trial level.  Bill has traveled to over 44 countries on five continents.  He sat in on appellate cases in Edinburgh Scotland and Sydney Australia.  Bill has a Masters in History from the College of William & Mary in Virginia.  His thesis on President Eisenhower's decision to not intervene in Vietnam at Dien Bien Phu in May 1954, was going to form the basis of the first chapter on presidential decision making by George Stephanopoulos and Todd Brewster.  Bill was a member of the Washing & Lee University Law Review, where he published an article on the legality of economic sanctions under principles of international law.  Writing is in his blood as he is a cousin of George Plimpton, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow and Edwin Ginn founder of Ginn & Co. Book publishers.  Bill's great-great-grand uncle was Otis Ingraham, who was Captain of the ship Pentagoet which was lost during the Gale of '98 while carrying toys for the children of Rockland, Maine from New York City.  Bill was a triple major at Colby College where he was manager of the Colby Hockey Team.  Bill grew up in Dover, Massachusetts and graduated from the Roxbury Latin School in Boston.

During Governor Baldacci's trade mission to France, Bill conducted a meeting with the curator of the Marmottan Museum in Paris.  Bill negotiated a lending of paintings from the Marmottan to Maine, but no Maine museum could afford the insurance.  Bill has lectured on his cousin General Adelbert Ames, as well as on French Impressionism and Magna Carta.  Bill continues to practice state and federal criminal law, divorce and personal injury law from his office overlooking Rockport Harbor.  If not practicing law or writing, Bill would like to have played left field for the Boston Red Sox or worked for the front office of the New England Patriots.

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WILLIAM H. WELTE INCLUDED IN 2014 THE BEST LAWYERS IN AMERICA IN ADMIRALTY AND MARITIME LAW

CAMDEN - Camden attorney William H. ("Sandy") Welte has been selected by his peers for inclusion in the 2014 edition of The Best Lawyers in America in the specialty of Admiralty and Maritime Law.

Attorney Welte has been a Proctor member of the Maritime Law Association of the United States since 1982 and currently serves on several of its standing committees.  He is an Associate Editor of American Maritime Cases, an official Court Reporter, and has practiced admiralty and maritime law throughout New England during his career.  Mr. Welte's practice includes a wide-range of marine matters including the Jones Act, vessel collisions, salvage, cargo claims, vessel construction contracts and vessel financing.  In addition to representing marine underwriters, vessel owners, banks, boatyards and individuals in both the State and Federal Courts, Mr. Welte has represented clients before international arbitration tribunals and has served on a number of marine arbitration panels himself as either arbitrator or panel chairman.  Attorney Welte has been retained to serve as an expert witness in maritime and admiralty law and has been a frequent speaker before both regional and national marine industry organizations.

For more than three decades, Best Lawyers has been regarded - by both the profession and the public - as the most credible and definitive guide to legal excellence in the United States.

Selection to Best Lawyers is based on a rigorous peer-review survey comprised of more than 4 million confidential evaluations by the top attorneys in the country.  Because lawyers are not required or allowed to a fee to be included, being listed in Best Lawyers is considered a singular honor.  Their annual, advertisement-free publication has been described by The American Lawyer as "the most respected referral list of attorneys in practice."

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LINCOLN COUNTY BAR ASSOCIATION ANNOUNCES SELECTION OF ANDREW ZULIEVE AS NEW PRESIDENT

LINCOLN COUNTY, July 2013 - Andrew "Andy" Zulieve is pleased to take over as the new president of the Lincoln County Bar Association.  He has over twenty years of experience in all non-patent areas of intellectual property and business law with a concentration in the areas of copyright, trademark, and trade secret.  He also handles real estate & construction law matters.  In May of 2011 he opened his own solo practice, ZulieveLaw in Waldoboro after many years of commuting to a firm in central Maine.

He has family ties to Maine but grew up in the Washington, D.C., area.  Each year his family would vacation in Maine during which time, he fell in love with the state and particularly its coast.  During his tenure in law school, Andy was a law clerk for Finnegan Henderson, one of the world's largest intellectual property firms headquartered in Washington, D.C.  After passing the Maine Bar and before moving to Maine some twenty years ago, he was a trademark examining attorney for the United States Trademark Office where he successfully argued appeals before the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board.  He lives in mid-coast Maine with his wife Holly and their two pugs, Briggs and Lily.  He enjoys presenting lectures and seminars, and has had articles published on various topics of copyright, trademark and trade secret matters.  Andy is a member of the Intellectual Property, Corporations and Real Estate divisions of the Maine Bar Association, and actively participates in local community business groups.  He received his B.A. degree from Miami University in Oxford, Ohio and Juris Doctorate from The Antioch Law School in Washington, D.C.

Moving his practice to Waldoboro has provided a number of very meaningful benefits, both personally and professionally.  The move has provided opportunities to become part of and contribute to his town, and to reunite and collaborate with his outstanding fellow attorneys in the area.  Andy is eager and dedicated to his position as president of the LCBA.  He is dedicated to "doing my best to uphold the dignified tradition of the Lincoln County Bar Association and the extremely high level of ethics, professionalism and client services of its members."

Andrew can be reached at ZulieveLaw by calling 207-790-2185.

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THREE LOCAL WOMEN MAINE'S NEWEST LAWYERS

VillageSoup, 11/27/13

PORTLAND - Three Camden women have earned the right to practice law in the state of Maine after passing the legal bar examination in October.

Katherine Dickey, Marina Sideris and Karinna Russo successfully passed the examination at the end of July and were sworn in by Maine Supreme Court Justice Joseph Jabar at the end of October.

"We were surprised to see these three local girls admitted to the bar on the same day," said David Dickey, father of Katherine Dickey.  "The best part of the story is that they are all going to stay and work in the area."

Each applicant for the examination was sponsored by an active member of the Maine bar.

Dickey was sponsored by Waldo County District Attorney Eric Walker, Sideris was sponsored by Joseph Steinberger, Esq. of Rockland and Russo was sponsored by her mother, Carolyn Russo, Esq. 

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MARK COURSEY JOINS ELLIOTT & MACLEAN

Mark comes to Elliott & MacLean after recently graduating from the University of Maine School of Law in Portland.  While at the University of Maine School of Law he participated in an externship with Connecticut General Assembly, Lewiston-Auburn Economic Growth Council, and the Maine Human Rights Commission.  During his last year of law school Mark interned with Elliott & MacLean, LLP, working under the guidance of Christopher MacLean, Esq., where he mainly assisted with the murder case of State v. Arnold Diana.  Prior to law school, Mark obtained his Bachelor of Science in Leadership & Organizational Studies from the University of Southern Maine.

Mark grew up in southern New England, and has lived in Maine for the last 20 years.  He has been involved in several civic organizations over the years, including Rotary, United Way, Good Shepherd Food Bank, and the American Cancer Society.

Mark is admitted to practice law in Maine, and concentrates his practice on criminal law, employment law, and human resource law.  He is a member of the Knox County Bar Association.

In his free time, Mark enjoys photography and spending time with his two sons.

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USING SOCIAL MEDIA TO BOOST LAWYERS' REVENUE AND REPUTATION

As social media continues to work its way into the marketing budgets of small businesses, professionals are finding that they can no longer ignore its ability to reach today's customers, interact with and expand their professional networks, and greatly enhance their marketing efforts.

Presenting to the Knox County Bar Association on Wednesday, March 20, Dream Local Digital's Shannon Kinney will introduce the group of attorneys to strategies and specific steps they can take to incorporate social media into their practice and show them how to use Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn to increase revenue and enhance their reputation online.  Her presentation will cover the following key topics, each tailored for this unique group:

Content Planning - What should they share online?  How often?

Expediting Reach - How do they reach new clients on social media and search engines?

Paid Advertising - How much of their marketing budget should be shifted to online marketing and search engines?

Professional Networking - How can they use social media and online marketing to enhance their professional reputation and build their network?

Client Services - How can they use social media and online marketing to help existing clients and reach out to potential clients?

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WALDOBORO ATTORNEY TO PRESENT TITLE WORKSHOP AT SOUTH PORTLAND SEMINAR

  

Andrew J. Zulieve of ZulieveLaw in Waldoboro will participate in the upcoming National Business Institute or NBI seminar, Title Workshop: From Examination to Commitment.

The event will be held Monday, April 1 at Doubletree Hotel in South Portland.  His lecture will address title searches and land surveys, and ethical considerations affecting attorneys in real estate transactions.  The NBI offers a series of specialized training courses and materials to lawyers and professions through live, online, telephonic and written media.

Zulieve has more than 20 years of experience in business, real estate, construction, contract negotiations, with special focus on intellectual property and e-commerce law.

During law school, he was a law clerk for the D.C. headquarters of Finnegan Henderson, one of the world's largest intellectual property firms.  During his tenure at the United States Trademark Office, he successfully argued cases before the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board.  Today, from his office ZulieveLaw in Midcoast Maine, Zulieve serves clients both nationally and internationally.

He actively participates in the real estate, intellectual property and corporate law divisions of the Maine Bar Association and various community business groups.  In addition, he regularly presents lectures and seminars, and publishes articles and columns on a variety of subjects focusing on current issues of copyright, trademark, trade secret and e-commerce law, and related best-business practices.  He earned his bachelor of arts degree from Miami University in Ohio and his juris doctorate degree from the Antioch Law School in Washington, D.C.

Fore more information, Zulieve can be reached at 790-2185 or by e-mail at ajzlaw@roadrunner.com.

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LEE WOODWARD, JR., ESQUIRE OFFERING BUSINESS LAW COURSE AT UMAINE HUTCHINSON CENTER

The University of Maine Hutchinson Center will be offering the course "The Legal Environment of Business" taught by local attorney, businessman, and active community member Lee Woodward, Jr.  Topics to be covered include the American legal system, employment law, business organization, critical issues facing businesses, and how to keep informed about current business and legal issues.  This course is perfect for local business owners, as well as business degree students or advanced year high school students interested in business or law.

This dynamic and interactive "live" course meets on Monday evenings from 5:30-8:00pm starting on January 14, 2013 and ending on May 3, 2013.  For more information or to register, contact Jose Cordero at 338-8020 or visit http://www.hutchinsoncenter.umaine.edu.

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NEW HOPE FOR WOMEN APPOINTS ATTORNEY ALISON WHOLEY TO BOARD OF DIRECTORS

  

Local nurse attorney Alison Wholey was recently appointed to the Board of Directors of New Hope for Women, located in Rockland.  New Hope for Women offers support to people in Sagadahoc, Lincoln, Knox and Waldo Counties affected by domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking, and provides educational resources to assist communities in creating a safer and healthier future.  Services are offered to assist women, men, their children, friends, family and all people affected by domestic and dating violence, along with such help as a 24-hour domestic abuse hotline, emergency shelter, support groups and other resources.

New Hope for Women also provides aid in educating the community, providing awareness and preventing domestic and dating violence through a variety of programs.

Alison has participated in multi-million dollar verdicts and settlements on behalf of patients and their families, drawing on her experience as a Registered Nurse.

Alison Wholey has been practicing law since 1986.  She is a partner with the statewide law firm of Briggs & Wholey, LLC.  Ms. Wholey is a member of the Board of Governors for the Maine Trial Lawyers Association, a member of the Joseph Halpern Inns of Court, American Association for Justice, Maine State Bar Association, Maine Trial Lawyers Association, and the Knox County Bar Association.  Alison also serves as a court-appointed Guardian Ad Litem on occasion.  Ms. Wholey lives in Tenants Harbor and is the mother of Daniel and Anna.  She has a large immediate family in Maine, New Hampshire, and Massachusetts.

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KNOX COUNTY ATTORNEYS ATTEND JUDICIAL CONFERENCE

VillageSoup, 10/30/12

ROCKPORT - Knox County attorneys Don Briggs and William Welte attended the recent U.S. District Court Judicial Conference held at the Samoset Resort on Oct. 25 and 26.  Don Briggs practices law at the law firm of Briggs & Wholey, LLC in Rockport.  William Welte practices law at the law firm of Welte & Welte, P.A. in Camden.

Every two years the United States District Court for the District of Maine holds a conference for invited attorneys who practice in the federal court in Maine.  The conference serves as an opportunity for continuing legal education as well as to promote interchanges between the judges and attorneys.

This year's conference featured sessions devoted to civil practice, criminal practice and bankruptcy practice as well as a presentation by the president of Bowdoin College, Barry Mills, who spoke about the role of education in creating opportunities for graduates to become important participants in the Maine economy, community and society.  Other presentations included a panel discussion about Farming, Fishing, Forestry: The Past, Present and Future of Maine's Traditional Economic Engine.  Maine author and journalist, Colin Woodward, gave a presentation on The Lobster Coast: The Past, Present and Future of Coastal Maine in which he discussed how history shapes the debates on today's pressing issues.

In an effort to support Maine's farms, fisheries and businesses, locally-grown vegetables, fruit, chicken and seafood were served at the conference.

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SCOTT HESS JOINS ELLIOTT & MACLEAN

Scott comes to Elliott and MacLean after being a solo practitioner for almost three years. He is a 2005 graduate of Franklin Pierce College, where he obtained a degree in psychology. Afterward he enrolled at Western New England College School of Law, where he received several academic scholarships. While at Western New England College Scott was on the Dean’s List, was a member of the Products Liability Moot Court Team and participated in an externship in which he clerked for the District Court in Holyoke, Massachusetts. During his third year of law school Scott was a visiting student at the University Of Maine School Of Law in Portland, where he participated on the trial team and the Cumberland Legal Aid Clinic. Scott graduated cum laude from Western New England in 2009.

Although Scott’s solo practice primarily involved litigation, he is excited to be practicing in the areas of Real Estate and Elder Law/Estate Planning at Elliott and MacLean. Scott enjoys the challenge of finding creative approaches to solving problems that fit the individual needs of his clients.

Scott Practices in the areas of

  • Real Estate

  • Elder law/Estate Planning

  • Bankruptcy

  • General Litigation

  • Appellate Law

Scott currently resides in the Gardiner area, but is in the process of moving to the mid-coast with his wife, who is a teacher in the local school district. Scott enjoys all things outdoors, including camping, hiking, winter mountaineering, fishing, hunting, and kayaking.

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DON BRIGGS NAMED TO SUPER LAWYERS IN MAINE FOR FOURTH CONSECUTIVE YEAR

  

Minneapolis-based Law & Politics, publishers of Super Lawyers magazines, announced that Maine personal injury attorney Don Briggs has been named to the 2010 edition of New England Super Lawyers. This is the fourth consecutive year Briggs has been named a Super Lawyer from Maine. Each year, only 5 percent of the lawyers in the state receive this honor.

Super Lawyers recognizes outstanding attorneys in more than 70 areas of practice using a rigorous, multiphase selection process that considers 15 separate indicators of peer recognition, professional achievement, and high ethical standards.

“In law school, if you finish in the top 10 percent of your class, you graduate with honors and it’s a big deal,” said Bill White, publisher of Super Lawyers and Law & Politics magazines. “But with Super Lawyers, we select only five percent of the entire profession. These lawyers represent the cream of the crop.”

Briggs has handled thousands of personal injury cases in his career. He specializes in helping Maine victims of car accidents, medical malpractice, and other personal injury negligence cases. He is a board certified Civil Trial Advocate, a Past President of the Maine Trial Lawyers Association and a member of the Million Dollar Advocates Forum. He is the past editor of Maine Verdicts and has been recognized as a Fellow by the National College of Trial Advocacy. He is a member of the AAJ Professional Negligence Section and the AAJ Medical Negligence Information Exchange Group. Briggs is currently president of the Knox County Bar Association.

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RETIREMENT A 'COMPLICATED ENTERPRISE' BUT CALDERWOOD IS READY

(Courtesy Lynda Clancy / VillageSoup)

CAMDEN - Longtime Camden attorney Terry Calderwood is closing his books in the law library at Gibbons and Calderwood on Washington Street and heading for Tennessee. With him, he will take decades of experience mitigating municipal wrangling, courtroom drama, and debating before the Maine Supreme Court.

And as keeper of many tales, he will take with him secrets, few of which will ever resurface, unless they wind up ever so veiled in one of his books.

Because Calderwood, who knows this community inside and out, just might have a novel or two up his sleeve. He is due to retire at the end of December, and, of course, has plans, like traveling to Europe and South America.

"And like everybody else, I'm going to write a book," said the lawyer, who at one time entertained the idea of becoming a minister. A Methodist, he even went off to Boston University to study theology. That all changed, however, when he got a taste of law. Then he changed course, after a stint in the U.S. Army and the Vietnam War, to pursue a law degree at Duke University.

That is where he met his wife, Susan Calderwood, who was attending medical school. She was an internist at Maine Medical Center in Portland, and is now an anesthesiologist and professional at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tenn.

After earning their degrees, the Calderwoods came to Camden 36 years ago, Terry returning to the hometown where he grew up, graduating from Camden High School in 1967. Susan came with him, and together they raised two children: Charles is now earning a Ph.D. in industrial psychology at Georgia Tech and Matthew is studying linguistics at Vanderbilt.

Terry Calderwood, along with Paul Gibbons, worked for attorneys Cliff O'Rourke and Mark Ingraham. They had built the Washington Street law office, and O'Rourke, Camden's town attorney, retired in 1978, followed by Ingraham in 1986. Gibbons and Calderwood purchased the firm, and the two have carried it forward to 2010, acquiring a string of towns as clients.

In 2003, Calderwood retired as Camden's town attorney, but kept on a few smaller towns, such as Lincolnville. That town is now considering from a list of 12 applicants, who will next be its counselor.

Diane Bacon, who now works at the Lincolnville Town Office, previously worked for Calderwood at the law office.

"Terry is wonderful attorney and great person and boss," she said. "I wish him lots of happiness in his retirement.

Lincolnville Town Administrator David Kinney said that Calderwood has served his town with distinction for the past 30 years, and even predates the arrival of longtime town employee Doris Weed.

"His knowledge of the law of Lincolnville has served our town well, and he has been an invaluable resource," said Kinney.

Camden Select Board member John French agreed: "Terry kept us out of trouble and was a great attorney for the town. He was very conservative, and made sure both sides were handled respectfully. We'll miss him."

Calderwood, who has liked municipal law for all these decades, its political intrigues and eventual resolutions, also has appreciated business, real estate and probate law. And he really likes litigation, the trial work that compels the best debaters to step into a highly controlled yet intellectually competitive arena.

"I enjoyed the competition," he said. "It is like a chess match."

He is proud of the number of cases that Gibbons and Calderwood argued in the Maine Law Court -- 45, and 25 of them under Calderwood's direction.

"The Law Court [also known as Maine's Supreme Court] is intriguing because it creates precedent," he said. "It affects the law."

Before the seven justices on that court, the Socratic method becomes the tool for deriving truth.

"You have to think on your feet," said Calderwood.

Now Calderwood is slowly divesting himself of clients and cases, anticipating quieter days.

"Retirement is such a complicated enterprise," he acknowledges, and said there are multiple reasons, some personal, for flipping his closed sign; yet, there are the tangible benefits -- travel, which he has always loved. The Calderwoods have sold their Camden home, but his favorite place in the world is this area, and he will return on occasion to do those things he has always loved, like snowshoeing in the dead of January in the Camden Hills.

"I have always been affected by the natural beauty of Camden," said the native son.

And that novel he harbors is sited in Camden, based on a case he had years ago. He won't talk about it -- to the press, at any rate -- but it is secured in his mind.

In his retirement, Calderwood joins longtime Police Chief Phil Roberts, who is leaving his post at the end of December, and former town planner Jeff Nims, who recently retired from his position at the Camden Town Office. Nims is also writing a book, Calderwood knows.

"We'll see who gets to press first," he laughs, the competitive town attorney versus the methodical town planner.

Their public awaits.

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CHARTING IS MAIN ISSUE IN MALPRACTICE DECISION

(Courtesy Jo Lynn Southard / Maine Lawyers Review)

In some ways it was a typical medical malpractice case - although all such cases are "tricky," said plaintiff's attorney Alison Wholey Mynick - but Mynick felt there were two notable points in this case.

"In Maine these cases take so long, because of the pre-screening system," Mynick said.  The plaintiff's family had to carry the claim forward after plaintiff's death; the injury at issue here was not a cause of her death.

Mynick practices with Briggs & Counsel in Rockport.

Sybil Lavway had cardiac surgery in 2003.  The claim arose when Lavway was injured by the IV administration of dopamine.  Dopamine is used to improve a patient's cardiac and renal functioning and is therefore commonly given after cardiac surgery.  However, dopamine is also caustic.

Lavway developed a serious injury in her arm at the site of the IV transmission of dopamine.  Dopamine is normally given through a central line, which is more secure.  If dopamine is given in a peripheral IV line, for example, in the arm, the patient must be kept very still.  Unfortunately, Lavway was not a model patient and, indeed, pulled out IV lines from each arm.

The other issue that Mynick, a registered nurse as well as an attorney, pointed to was a lack of charting on the administration of dopamine.  Lavway had a central line, as well as an IV in each arm.  "She received several meds by IV," Mynick said, "but there was no documentation of which IV tube was used.  If they had only identified in the chart which IV tube was used, we wouldn't have had a trial."

Edward Gould of Gross, Minsky & Mogul represented defendant EMMC.  He said the charting issue was contested by both sides, but said that defendant's expert "said that charting the location of the IV was not at all required under the applicable standard of care."

"As a practical matter," Gould said, "there's only so much a nurse can chart without having less time for patients."  He also noted that at the time Lavway was hospitalized, notes were still handwritten and are now electronic.  He did not know if that meant more detailed information was being charted.

Plaintiff's expert disagreed, however, and Mynick said, "I can't imagine giving a patient an IV and note writing down the site.  If you give an intramuscular injunction, you have to note the location."

Although EMMC maintained that dopamine was not administered in the peripheral IV, the injury to Lavway's arm was treated as a chemical burn, which is consistent with damage from Dopamine.  It is a significant injury; she had to have surgery at a later date, and continued to have problems with her left arm.

Justice Jeffrey Hjelm found that dopamine extravasation was the "better explanation for Lavway's injury."  He awarded $600,000 plus costs to Lavway's estate.

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GILBERT JOINS ELLIOTT AND MACLEAN

  

Sarah Irving Gilbert comes to Elliott & MacLean as a Washington County native, having been born and raised in Machias, Maine.  After graduating from Machias High School, Sarah received several scholarships to attend Vassar College in Poughkeepsie, New York, where she pursued a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science.  Throughout her time at Vassar, Sarah cultivated a love of learning and new experiences, achieving coveted internship positions at the International Association of Women Judges (Washington, D.C.), Holland & Knight, LLP (Boston) and the Citizen's Jury Project / Harlem Children's Zone (New York, New York).  While in college, Sarah also studied abroad at the University of St. Andrews, Scotland's first university, founded in 1413.

After Vassar, Sarah relished the chance to return to Maine for law school, attending the University of Maine School of Law on several additional scholarships.  In law school Sarah was appointed by the Dean as the professor's assistant for Constitutional Law, Legal Writing, and Torts, in addition to serving as the Casenote Editor for the Ocean and Coastal Law Journal, and a student-attorney at the Cumberland Legal Aid Clinic.  She graduated from Maine Law magna cum laude and received the school's Pro Bono Publico Award for providing more than 80 hours of pro bono service during law school.  Sarah was then tapped by the Maine Supreme Court to serve as law clerk for the Hon. Donald G. Alexander.

Sarah credits her success in large part to her Downeast work ethic and exposure to the law at an early age: her mother, Rebecca Irving, has practiced law in Machias for over thirty years.  Sarah is admitted to practice law in Maine, both in State and Federal Court, and concentrates her practice on family law, administrative appeals, personal injury, and criminal defense.

She lives in Union, with her husband, Chris, where they both enjoy living on a dirt road and spending time outside.

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MAINE ASSOCIATION OF MEDIATORS PROGRAM

The Maine Association of Mediators is presenting a special evening with Harvard Law Professor, Robert Mnookin, Chair of Harvard's Program on Negotiation and author of "Bargaining with the Devil: When to Negotiate, When to Fight."  The program is October 4, 2010, at the Abromson Center, USM, 88 Bedford Street, Portland.  The social hour begins at 5:30 PM and the presentation begins at 6:45 PM.  For more information go to the Maine Association of Mediators website at www.mainemediators.org.

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ATTORNEY RUEF-LINDQUIST NAMED PRESIDENT OF MAINE BAR FOUNDATION

HALLOWELL - Sarah Ruef-Lindquist has been named President of the Board of the Maine Bar Foundation (MBF) for the year 2010.

Founded in 1983, MBF serves Maine's communities and the legal professional through its administration fo the Interest on Lawyer Trust Accounts ("IOLTA") Program and other public-service law related activities.  MBF funds Pine Tree Legal Services, the Volunteer Lawyers Project, Immigrant Legal Advocacy Project, Maine Equal Justice Partners, Legal Services for the Elderly, and Cumberland Legal Aid Clinic and has also provided funding to other non-profit organizations working to increase access to justice for those in poverty in Maine.

The Maine Bar Foundation has provided leadership and administrative support to one of the most successful fundraising initiatives amongst lawyers and the judiciary in the United States: Now in its 6th year, the Campaign for Justice raises more funds from lawyers and the judiciary in Maine for legal services than all but one other state, raising over $400,000 in each of the years 2008 and in 2009 to support access to justice.

Ruef-Lindquist, a member of the Foundation Board since 2003, has serves as Development Chair, Finance Chair, Investment Committee Chair and Treasurer.  She also serves on the board of the Maine Philanthropy Center.  She also serves on the Development Committee of Franklin Pierce Law Center, and has serves on numerous boards of Maine and New Hampshire non-profits.  She is a frequent writer and speaker on the topic of trust, estate and charitable planning, and is Senior Consultant and founder of Planning for Good, providing gift planning support services to non-profits.

The Maine Bar Foundation's offices are located at 40 Water Street, Hallowell.

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ROCKLAND ATTORNEY HEATH ELECTED TO STATE BAR ASSOCIATION BOARD OF GOVERNORS

The Herald Gazette, 11/17/09

ROCKLAND - Attorney Jason R. Heath has been elected to the Maine State Bar Association Board of Governors, with a two-year term to begin Jan. 1, 2010.

The MSBA is a voluntary association with more than 3,100 member lawyers licensed to practice in Maine.  The association serves as an advocate for lawyers, the courts and the public.  The Board of Governors, which sets policy, includes 13 governors representing various districts.  Heath will represent a district comprising Knox and Waldo counties.

"Knox County and Waldo County have phenomenal lawyers," said Heath, who practices in Rockland.  "I am excited to represent my colleagues on the board."

Heath attended Bowdoin College and Roger Williams University Law School.  He opened The Heath Law Firm in 2007.  His practice areas include wills, divorce and business law.

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LEGAL CAREERS SPAN THE GENERATIONS FOR COLLINS FAMILY

(Courtesy Stephen Betts / Village Soup)


Justin Coffin, right, was sworn into the Maine Bar on Oct. 21 at Knox County Superior Court.  He was sponsored by his uncle attorney Edward Collins, left.  The young man's grandfather, active retired Maine Supreme Judicial Court Justice Samuel Collins Jr., administered the oath to his grandson and other lawyers joining the bar.  (Image courtesy of Diane Field) 



ROCKLAND (Oct 28): The tradition of law for the Collins family continued with another generation last week in Knox County Superior Court.

Justin Coffin was sworn into the Maine Bar on October 21 by his grandfather, active retired Maine Supreme Judicial Court Justice Samuel Collins Jr.  Coffin's uncle attorney Edward Collins made the motion to have his nephew admitted to the bar.

Justice Collins is a Caribou native who graduated from the University of Maine and Harvard School of Law.

The elder Collins was appointed as a state Supreme Court judge in 1988 after a 40-year career as a private attorney.  He was state senator for Know County from 1975 through 1984 and served as Senate majority leader.  He became an active retired justice in 1994.

His son Edward Collins also became an attorney and practices in Rockland.

Coffin graduated from Gray-New Gloucester High School and the University of Maine School of Law.  He is currently seeking employment.

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LOCAL ATTORNEYS DONATE MONEY TO CAMPAIGN FOR JUSTICE PROJECT

The Courier-Gazette, 06/10/08

The Knox County Bar Association received a request from the Campaign for Justice for funding to create a Campaign for Justice informational video. This video would be an easily accessible and low-cost means for the Campaign to communicate its mission - to increase access to legal services for disadvantaged Maine people by raising funds on behalf of six legal aid organizations (Cumberland Legal Aid Clinic, Immigrant Legal Advocacy Project, Legal Services for the Elderly, Maine Equal Justice Partners, Maine Volunteer Lawyers Project and Pine Tree Legal Assistance). The Campaign was created in 2004 to increase access to justice for low income and elderly Maine citizens.

In response to this request, the Knox County Bar Association agreed to donate $400 towards the cost of the project. This donation represents a substantial portion of the total cost for the video. The KCBA plans to post this video on its website later this year. The President of the KCBA, Don Briggs said, "The attorneys of Knox County fully support the critical role of these legal aid organizations; especially in these difficult economic times."

The Campaign helps to fund the work of legal aid providers, which collaborate to insure the availability of a comprehensive, integrated network of legal services for low income and elderly Maine citizens throughout the entire state. Some examples of those the providers serve: A mother and her children face illegal eviction from their home; a victim of domestic violence needs assistance obtaining a court order of protection; a disabled worker has been illegally denied medical benefits; an older couple faces separation after a lifetime together because of government regulations for long-term care.

The 2006 Annual Report has some terrific stories of individuals and families who have attained access to justice thanks to the providers. You can learn more about the Campaign for Justice by visiting www.campaignforjustice.org.

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TWO ATTORNEYS CROSS THE BAR

(Courtesy Erin Rhoda / The Courier-Gazette)

  
Kelly A. Gould of Lincolnville, left, and James Lee Nickelson of Camden, right, were inducted into the Maine State Bar Association Wednesday at Knox County Superior Court.  Between them is attorney Elizabeth Gifford Stuart.



ROCKLAND - Two attorneys were inducted into the Maine State Bar Association Wednesday at Knox County Superior Court.

Fellow attorneys, family and friends watched on as Kelly A. Gould of Lincolnville and James Lee Nickelson of Camden took the oath at the association's induction ceremony Wednesday morning.  Justice Samuel W. Collins Jr. presided.

The Rev. Mark Glovin of Rockland's First Universalist Church, Maine Superior Court Justice Jeffrey Hjelm, Maine District Court Justice Patricia Worth and Knox County Probate Court Judge Carol Emery joined Collins in welcoming the pair.

Gould grew up in Connecticut and graduated from Morehead State University in Kentucky with a major in sociology.  She attended California State University at Sacramento to earn a master;s degree in social work and then graduated from the University of Connecticut School of Law in May 2007.  She has worked in the California State Legislature as a senior policy consultant in labor law.

Gould is married to Randy Helmhotz and is th emother of Carrie, 10, and Caitlin, 22.

Nickelson was an undergraduate at the University of Texas at Austin, where he majored in aerospace engineering.  He worked at NASA for three years, before attending Harvard Law School, from which he graduated in 1998.  He then moved to Colorado for four years to practice with three different law firms, mainly specializing in litigation and intellectual property work.  Afterward, he moved to Connecticut and worked for three years as in-house counsel at United Technologies Research Center.  Now, while living in Camden, he does long-distance work for Schubert, Osterrieder & Nickelson in Texas.

Nickelson is married to Becky Anderson and is the father of 20-month-old Eliza Nickelson.

At the induction, Collins encouraged the two to do pro bono work and explained a little of the history of distinguished lawyers in Maine.

The Maine State Bar Association is a professional and public service organization of more than 3,100 member lawyers licensed to practice in Maine.  It works to promote its members' professionalism and advance their skills and knowledge, helping them meet the legal needs of all Maine people and advance Maine's system of justice, according to its Web site.  Headquartered in Augusta, the MSBA is a voluntary association that serves as an advocate for lawyers, the courts, and the public.

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MAINE COURTS HOLD ADMINISTRATIVE WEEK

AUGUSTA - The Maine State Courts will hold the spring Administrative Week this year during the week of March 31 through April 4, 2008. The purpose of these temporary hours is to allow Court personnel to catch up on important work of the court and only emergency matters will be heard.  During the Administrative Week, the Clerks’ Offices in all District Courts, Superior Courts, and the Supreme Judicial Court will be open to the public from 12:00 P.M. until 4:00 P.M.

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BAR ASSOCIATION LAUNCHES NEW WEBSITE

ROCKLAND - The Knox County Bar Association has launched a new website at http://www.knoxbar.net.

Attorney Jason Heath, who oversees the website, commented, "The new website is a great resource for both attorneys and the public.  We have a comprehensive member directory that provides contact information about our members.  Additionally, the website contains many links to online legal resources."

Don Briggs, President of the Knox County Bar Association, agrees.  "The website allows us to communicate with our members and the public on important issues.  This is a very exciting time for the Association."

In addition to online legal resources, the new website contains a history of the Knox County Courthouse, a listing of past presidents of the Association, a history of the Association, Association Bylaws and news about the Association.

Attorney Alison Mynick commented, "This website contains something for everyone, both lawyer and non-lawyer alike."

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ATTORNEYS GATHER TO CELEBRATE, NOT TO LITIGATE

Knox County Bar Association Enjoys an Evening of Art at the Farnsworth Art Museum
October 12, 2007

“This is a first for us,” said Attorney Don Briggs, President of the Knox County Bar Association, last Friday evening as he surveyed the Farnsworth Art Museum library filled with members and their guests eating dessert, drinking champagne and heading off into the galleries to view the museum’s acclaimed collection of art. Briggs explained, “We’ve had traditional get-togethers before, but we wanted to do something different, and nothing compares to having a private showing of art work of this caliber.” Attorney and Farnsworth Board Member Ed Miller worked with Museum staff to arrange for the private showing that took place on the evening of October 12th. “We’re really lucky to have a top rated museum here in the midcoast, and I have to say that the Farnsworth’s willingness to allow us to be here tonight says a lot about the value the museum places on community,” said Miller. The Knox County Bar Association has been in existence since about 1860 as an informal gathering of local attorneys holding a banquet the few times a year that a Superior Court Justice would travel to Rockland to conduct trials. In 1923 the Knox County Bar-Library Association was formally established by an Act of the Maine Legislature, and has been meeting to enjoy friendships outside the courtroom ever since. Association Treasurer, Attorney Randall Watkinson, summed up the evening, saying “In the courtroom we might be adversaries, but tonight, with family and friends, we’re just folks who also happen to be lawyers, getting together for a great time.”

 

 

 

 

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